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first_imgRegistration for the seventh edition of the Okpekpe International 10km Road Race has been officially declared opened as the InternationalAssociation of Athletics Federations (IAAF) and the Association of International Marathons and Distance Races (AIMS) have confirmed Saturday May 25 date for the first and only IAAF silver label road race in Nigeria nay West Africa.For the second year running, the race is the only IAAF silver Label Road Race in Africa listed in the January to May calendar of road races released by the IAAF and AIMS. “As the only road race in West Africa with a silver label status and the only one certified by AIMS in the sub-region of Africa, it is thus expected  that we will be listed in the calendar of both the IAAF and AIMS,” stressed  race spokesman Dare Esan.He also revealed that registration of intending runners is officially on and it is opened to all categories of runners.“The race is not only for professional athletes who want to run for the prize monies on offer or to improve on their times for ranking purposes. It is also opened to people who want to run for fun or for charity,” he added and revealed how intending runners can be registered.“For quick and easy registration, intending runners for all categories can download the tracking application launched for the race in 2017 or visit the website www.okpekperoadrace.com to register.“We are delighted to announce that intending runners at the seventh edition of the race can also use our tracking application to register for the race,” said Esan.“Runners can also register through our website www.okpekperoadrace.com.Registration will not however be limited to online platforms as we intend to use the Athletics Federation of Nigeria (AFN) and the Edo State Athletics Association to help distribute the registration forms when the time comes. The online platform is mainly for those who are far from the registration points that will be announced in due course.”The Okpekpe international 10km road race is one of only two road races in Nigeria certified by the IAAF and the only one recognised by the Association of International Marathons and Distance Races (AIMS).This year’s race will hold in Okpekpe, a town in Etsakor East Local Government Area of Edo State, Nigeria. It is located about 25 kilometres northeast of Auchi.Last year, Kenya’s Kibet Alex won the men’s title (29.46) while Ethiopia’s Yani Dera Dida emerged the women’s best.Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegramlast_img read more

first_imgOn Monday, the USC Shoah Foundation hosted a special presentation in the Ronald Tutor Campus Center by Douglas Greenberg about the “forgotten” Holocaust story of the providence of Wolyn, Poland.History buff · Douglas Greenberg focused on Holocaust survivors in Poland. He credits his interest in this time period to his grandfather. – Kirstin Louie | Daily TrojanThe event focused on the story of the Jewish population of Wolyn during the Holocaust and how its story has been widely forgotten.Greenberg is a current Rutgers University professor who served as executive director of the USC Shoah Foundation from 2000 to 2008. He returned to USC this year as an Institute Fellow to carry out research in USC’s Visual History Archive regarding the richly historic, yet often overlooked region of Wolyn.“I feel that I gained a completely different perspective from the lecture,” said Jason Cheong, a sophomore majoring in history. “In class we’ve only been taking one approach to the history of the Holocaust, so it was interesting to learn this side too.”In his presentation, Greenberg discussed how his personal interest in this field began with his own grandfather, who lived in the region of Wolyn. This personal connection, combined with Greenberg’s background in history, are both factors which sparked his curiosity in the Holocaust history of Wolyn.His research seeks to reconstruct and shine a light on the experience of the Wolyn survivors. This task, however, is incredibly difficult due to the complex history of Wolyn, as well as the fact that only 1.5 percent of Jews in Wolyn communities survived the Holocaust.“I think that I have uncovered an aspect of the Holocaust that is mostly unknown,” Greenberg said. “I hope that [attendees of the lecture] come away with an awareness that the Holocaust was not a simple event in history, and its complexity is important.”Many of the students who attended were able to relate the lecture directly to their various classes, such as those in Jewish history courses and religious or conflict study classes.“In my class, we’re examining different case studies and deciding whether or not religion is directly tied to violence,” said Natalie Tecimer, a junior majoring in international relations. “The Holocaust is clearly a prime example of this, and I feel like I gained a better understanding of my class and of the Holocaust itself by listening to this lecture.”Greenberg discussed the specific nature of his work in the archives, as well. Over the years, he has devoted himself to research which relies on approximately 500 video interviews in the Shoah Foundation archive.During the presentation, Greenberg played an archive segment of one of the Wolyn survivors detailing her experience in escaping Wolyn. The survivor touched on the fact that the horrific and unspeakable experiences that her loved ones faced are forgotten in history.“Personally, it was my first time hearing about Wolyn,” said Rebecca Ahdoot, a sophomore majoring in public relations. “Seeing that video made me realize how much of a tragedy it is that those people’s lives and experiences are just forgotten.”As Greenberg shared, 98.5 percent of Wolyn Jews were exterminated, leaving a very limited number of survivors to tell their story. Through his research in the archives, however, Greenberg hopes to raise not only awareness of the issue, but also tolerance and education of the complexity of this event.“The speaker really brought to life the fact that those in Wolyn did not receive as much attention those murdered in the concentration camps,” said Emily Shemian, an undecided freshman. “Public memory needs to be amended and bring forth these truths that have been really held back.”When asked about the most difficult part of his research, Greenberg noted that the subject is incredibly emotionally taxing.“It is challenging to maintain composure and emotional distance [when watching the archives] for scholarly work, while simultaneously feeling such powerful emotion towards the subject,” Greenberg said. “However, I do feel that my research has made me a better human being.”last_img read more

first_img“It’s funny – one of our coaches said, ‘I think this is gonna be a Lou night tonight,’ ” Clippers coach Doc Rivers said. “They prepared for us pretty well, their switching affected us a little bit, but Lou has pretty much seen every defense that anyone can throw at him and he was fantastic.”Steamrolled by Williams’ big performance, the Lakers suffered their second straight loss without LeBron James, this one uglier than the last. A night after giving up a buzzer-beating 3-pointer, the Lakers lost steam much earlier, failing to score during a 4:37-long stretch from the time Stephenson hit a 3-pointer in the third quarter to a Tyson Chandler free throw in the fourth.Sign up for Home Turf and get exclusive stories every SoCal sports fan must read, sent daily. Subscribe here.Williams kicked off the rally with a layup, his first step as unstoppable as his jump shot. The Clippers took their first lead of the second half on a Patrick Beverley free throw, and then the points kept piling up. The added physicality of a defense-oriented lineup, which included Beverley, Montrezl Harrell and Tyrone Wallace, kept the Lakers off-balance.Even as the Lakers had a chance to respond at the quarter break with a new lineup, they couldn’t find an answer despite cycling through several schemes. Their legs started to feel heavy on the weight of the second game of a back-to-back.“They just got there and got their scrappy unit in and really affected us because they brought a lot of energy,” said Kyle Kuzma, who had 24 points, eight rebounds and five assists for the Lakers. “What we were trying to do is just switch up our defenses, put a little bit of box-and-one, triangle-and-two on some of those guys. And it worked for a second, but at the end of the day, not enough.” The Clippers led 95-80 by the end of the run, which Sindarius Thornwell padded with a pair of free throws.The 22-point blitz was the largest unanswered run by any NBA team this season, and the largest the Clippers have authored since 2009. And instead of saving their most competitive instincts for the Clippers, the Lakers spent a chunk of the run arguing with each other – something Walton was adamant could not happen again.“I felt like they turned it up a notch and we weren’t ready to counterpunch,” he said. “Trying to find a group that was ready to bring that back. We couldn’t find it. We couldn’t find it tonight. It’s not the loss, I felt like we kind of started to splinter a little bit while it was happening. That can’t happen. We can lose games, but we’ll lose them together. When we win them we’ll win them together.”The Lakers fought back after the run, but Williams all but buried them with the Air Guitar 3-pointer with 2:23 left, putting the Clippers ahead by 12. It sealed the team’s fourth win in their last five games, as they got the added bonus of going up two games in the loss column against the Lakers, one of the teams they’re competing with in the packed Western Conference standings.The Lakers got a solid effort from their so-called young core: Lonzo Ball had 19 points, six assists and five rebounds. Brandon Ingram (17) and Josh Hart combined for 29 points. But the lack of depth showed: The Lakers had just an eight-man rotation and centers Ivica Zubac and Tyson Chandler combined for just 13 points inside.Danilo Gallinari scored 19 points for the Clippers, while Harrell added 12. Williams said the depth was as much of a factor as his own one-man offense.“We’re a good basketball team,” he said. “We’ve got a lot of guys who can come in at the drop of a hat and give us positive minutes. But for the most part, we had our core second group out there, where we got some chemistry and the other guys kind of understand how we play.”The end of the game got heated: Hart was ejected for arguing after a no-call when he thought Tobias Harris had committed a charge against him. Lakers coach Luke Walton also got a tech on the same play.All of the Lakers’ injured players were prominent presences on the sideline: JaVale McGee, who warmed up but was a scratch from the lineup, wore a suit. Fresh off surgery in the morning, Rajon Rondo sat with a wrap around his injured right hand.James walked into Staples Center in a white hoodie and black blazer, carrying a glass of red wine. Walton’s pregame comments, that the Lakers would exercise plenty of caution bringing their players back into games, suggested it might be some time before James is back in a jersey.In the meantime, the Lakers are searching for their first win without James. Walton said he still felt confident the group he has healthy can navigate the upcoming stretch without James (the length of which is still not yet known), but the Lakers also know they need to be better than they were Friday night.“We got to stay together no matter if it’s going good or going bad,” Ball said. “We got to stay together. Teams are going to go on runs, that happens, but 22-0 run should never happen.” PreviousLos Angeles Clippers guard Avery Bradley, forward Tobias Harris, guard Shai Gilgeous-Alexander and guard Lou Williams, from left, stand on the court during the second half of the team’s NBA basketball game against the Los Angeles Lakers on Friday, Dec. 28, 2018, in Los Angeles. The Clippers won 118-107. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Clippers forward Danilo Gallinari, right, of Italy, shoots as Lakers center Tyson Chandler defends during the first half of Friday’s game at Staples Center. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Lakers guard Lonzo Ball, left, shoots as Clippers guard Patrick Beverley defends during the first half of Friday’s game at Staples Center. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill) SoundThe gallery will resume insecondsClippers guard Patrick Beverley, right, shoots as Lakers center Tyson Chandler defends during the first half of Friday’s game at Staples Center. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Lakers center Ivica Zubac, right, shoots as Clippers center Boban Marjanovic defends during the first half of Friday’s game at Staples Center. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Clippers center Boban Marjanovic, left, shoots as Lakers guard Lonzo Ball defends during the first half of Friday’s game at Staples Center. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Lakers forward Brandon Ingram shoots as Clippers guard Shai Gilgeous-Alexander, left, and forward Tobias Harris defend during the first half of Friday’s game at Staples Center. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Clippers forward Danilo Gallinari dunks as Lakers guard Lance Stephenson watches during the first half of Friday’s game at Staples Center. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Lakers forward Brandon Ingram, right, shoots as Clippers center Boban Marjanovic defends during the first half of Friday’s game at Staples Center. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Lakers forward LeBron James, left, shakes hands with Coach Luke Walton as they have a chat during the first half of Friday’s game against the Clippers at Staples Center. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Los Angeles Clippers guard Sindarius Thornwell, right, shoots as Los Angeles Lakers center Tyson Chandler defends during the second half of an NBA basketball game Friday, Dec. 28, 2018, in Los Angeles. The Clippers won 118-107. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Los Angeles Lakers guard Kentavious Caldwell-Pope, left, and Los Angeles Clippers guard Shai Gilgeous-Alexander go after a loose ball during the second half of an NBA basketball game Friday, Dec. 28, 2018, in Los Angeles. The Clippers won 118-107. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Los Angeles Lakers forward Brandon Ingram, left, and guard Josh Hart, right, compete for a rebound with Los Angeles Clippers guard Sindarius Thornwell during the second half of an NBA basketball game Friday, Dec. 28, 2018, in Los Angeles. The Clippers won 118-107. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Los Angeles Clippers guard Lou Williams, left, shoots as Los Angeles Lakers center Ivica Zubac defends during the second half of an NBA basketball game Friday, Dec. 28, 2018, in Los Angeles. The Clippers won 118-107. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Los Angeles Clippers forward Tobias Harris, right, shoots as Los Angeles Lakers forward Kyle Kuzma defends during the second half of an NBA basketball game Friday, Dec. 28, 2018, in Los Angeles. The Clippers won 118-107. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Los Angeles Clippers coach Doc Rivers, left, and guard Lou Williams talks during the second half of the team’s NBA basketball game against the Los Angeles Lakers on Friday, Dec. 28, 2018, in Los Angeles. The Clippers won 118-107. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Los Angeles Lakers forward Kyle Kuzma, right, shoots as Los Angeles Clippers center Marcin Gortat defends during the second half of an NBA basketball game Friday, Dec. 28, 2018, in Los Angeles. The Clippers won 118-107. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Clippers guard Lou Williams shoots a jumper over Lakers guard Josh Hart during the second half of Friday’s game at Staples Center. Williams scored 23 of his season-high 36 points in the second half of the Clippers’ 118-107 victory. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Los Angeles Clippers guard Avery Bradley, forward Tobias Harris, guard Shai Gilgeous-Alexander and guard Lou Williams, from left, stand on the court during the second half of the team’s NBA basketball game against the Los Angeles Lakers on Friday, Dec. 28, 2018, in Los Angeles. The Clippers won 118-107. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Clippers forward Danilo Gallinari, right, of Italy, shoots as Lakers center Tyson Chandler defends during the first half of Friday’s game at Staples Center. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)NextShow Caption1 of 18Clippers forward Danilo Gallinari, right, of Italy, shoots as Lakers center Tyson Chandler defends during the first half of Friday’s game at Staples Center. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)ExpandLOS ANGELES — As Lou Williams skipped backward on defense moments after draining a 3-point dagger in the grill of Lance Stephenson, he kept a straight face.In his hands, he strummed an air guitar – call it a tribute or a taunt to Stephenson’s own 3-point celebration.The 32-year-old later told reporters it was all in good fun. It certainly looked it as Sweet Lou took what he wanted – points, a win and celebrations – enjoying his best scoring night of the season while leading a 22-0 run in the second half of a 118-107 Clippers victory over the Lakers.Williams, a former Laker, was 11 for 18 from the field, the one element of the Clippers offense that the Lakers truly had no answer for. He finished with 36 points (23 after halftime), eight better than his previous best this year, and reminded Staples Center fans why he earned NBA Sixth Man of the Year honors last season.center_img Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Errorlast_img read more