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first_imgThe mitotic spindle, an apparatus that segregates chromosomes during cell division, may be more complex than the standard textbook picture suggests, according to researchers at the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS).The findings, which result from quantitative measurements of the mitotic spindle, appear in the journal Cell.The researchers used a femtosecond laser to slice through the strands of the organelle and then performed a mathematical analysis to infer the microscopic structure of the spindle from its response to this damage.“We’ve been using this nanosurgery technique to understand the architecture and assembly of the spindle in a way that was never possible before,” says Eric Mazur, Balkanski Professor of Physics and Applied Physics at Harvard, who co-authored the study. “It’s very exciting.”The spindle, which is made of protein strands called microtubules, forms during cell division and segregates chromosomes into the daughter cells. It was previously unclear how microtubules are organized in the spindles of animal cells, and it was often assumed that the microtubules stretch along the length of the entire structure, pole to pole.Mazur and his colleagues demonstrated that the microtubules can begin to form throughout the spindle. They also vary in length, with the shortest ones close to the poles.“We wondered whether this size difference might result from a gradient of microtubule stabilization across the spindle, but it actually results from transport,” says lead author Jan Brugués, a postdoctoral fellow at SEAS. “The microtubules generally nucleate and grow from the center of the spindle, from which point they are transported towards the poles. They disassemble over the course of their life span, resulting in long, young microtubules close to the midline and older, short microtubules closer to the poles.”“This research provides concrete evidence for something that we’ve only been able to estimate until now,” Brugués adds.Mazur and Brugués worked with Daniel Needleman, assistant professor of applied physics and molecular and cellular biology at Harvard, and Valeria Nuzzo, a former postdoctoral fellow in Mazur’s lab at SEAS, to bring the tools of applied physics to bear on a biological question.The team used a femtosecond laser to make two small slices perpendicular to the plane of growth of the spindle apparatus in egg extracts of the frog species Xenopus laevis.They were then able to collect quantitative data on the reconstruction of the spindle following this disruption and precisely determine the length and polarity of individual microtubules. Observing the speed and extent of depolymerization (unraveling) of the spindle, the team worked backwards to compile a complete picture of the beginning and end points of each microtubule. Finally, additional experiments and a numerical model confirmed the role of transport.“The laser allowed us to make precise cuts and perform experiments that simply were not possible using previous techniques,” says Mazur.With further inquiries into spindle architecture, the researchers hope that scientists will one day have a complete understanding, and possibly even control over, the formation of the spindle.“Understanding the spindle means understanding cell division,” notes Brugués. “With a better understanding of how the spindle is supposed to operate, we have more hope of tackling the range of conditions — from cancer to birth defects — that result from disruptions to the cell cycle or from improper chromosomal segregation.”The research was supported by the National Science Foundation and by a fellowship from the Human Frontiers Science Program.For additional information, contact Caroline Perry at [email protected]last_img read more

first_imgKLP said it blacklisted the Hong Kong-based Texwinca, which produces fabrics for the apparel industry, after discovering systematic violations of human rights in its factories in Vietnam.It also cut its holdings in Australian investment company WHSP and US tobacco firm Turning Point Brands due to the companies deriving revenue from coal and tobacco respectively.KLP said that, while it was not obliged to follow recommendations made by the Council on Ethics on the exclusion of companies, it usually did.“The assessment made by the Council on Ethics is thorough and well-documented, and we see no reason to deviate from it. The openness of Norges Bank and the Council on Ethics on which companies they exclude is important,” said Marte Siri Storaker, adviser for responsible investments at KLP’s investment arm, KLP Kapitalforvaltning.She added: “The companies are experiencing greater pressure to clean up when more investors are clear on which guidelines they have to deal with.” Norwegian pension fund Kommunal Landspensjonskasse (KLP) has excluded three companies for violations of human rights and involvement in the coal and tobacco sectors.Based on recommendations made by the Council on Ethics – the advisory body for Norway’s sovereign wealth fund – the NOK675.6bn (€69.6bn) pension provider excluded Texwinca Holdings, Washington H Soul Pattinson & Co (WHSP) and Turning Point Brands.KLP said it had only been invested in two of the three companies when the decision was put into effect on 13 March: it owned a stake worth around NOK2.9m in WHSP and roughly NOK96,700 in Texwinca Holdings.Norway’s NOK8.9trn sovereign wealth fund also had investments in Texwinca and WHSP but divested from them in January.last_img read more

first_img UKGC launches fourth National Lottery licence competition August 28, 2020 Share Clare Swindell – CamelotNational Lottery operator Camelot UK has confirmed the appointment of Group CFO Clare Swindell as a corporate governance director, joining Chief Executive Nigel Railton as the second company executive to sit on the Camelot Board.Swindell has served as Camelot’s group financial lead since May 2017, having joined the lottery operator from Tesco owned retail data solutions provider dunnhumby.Confirming the board appointment, Camelot governance highlights Swindell’s extensive 17-year executive career having led financial planning, key projects and major transformation programmes as CFO of Tesco.com and Group Audit Director of Tesco Plc.Camelot Chairman, Sir Hugh Robertson commented: “I am delighted to welcome Clare to the Camelot Board. Since joining Camelot just over two years ago, Clare’s wide-ranging operational experience – as well as her extensive knowledge of strategic finance and internal control processes – has added great value to the business.“This appointment recognises Clare’s seniority and contribution, and while her role and responsibilities as CFO will remain unchanged, she will be taking on additional and important statutory duties and obligations. The rest of the Board and I very much look forward to working with Clare in this enhanced capacity.” Share Submit StumbleUpon Camelot aims for ‘Big September’ supporting a high street recovery August 26, 2020 Related Articles National Lottery Community Fund issues £14m in Climate Action grants August 24, 2020last_img read more

first_imgDAY TWO MondayABC v KPA 9amAPR v Don Bosco 11amPatriots v Savio 1pmKCCA v Equity 3pmUCU v KPA 5pmCity Oil v Hawassa 7pmPower v Gondar 9pmShare on: WhatsApp The Italian Ambassador to Uganda Domenico Fornara (right) handing over a trophy to FUBA President Ambrose Tashobya at the launch of the 2017 FIBA Africa Zone 5 Club Championships at City Oil Kamwokya on Saturday.  The Africa Zone 5 Championships starts October 1 at Lugogo. PHOTO @cityoilersDay 1 Africa Zone5 Champs 2017APR 45  ?? KCCA 57  ??Hawassa  43 Patriots 110KPA 108  Gondar 35UCU 108 Horseed 42Equity 70 Don Bosco 48City Oil 93 Savio 46Power 87 ABC 55MenGROUP A – City Oil – Uganda; Patriots – Rwanda; Savio – Tanzania; Hawassa City – EthiopiaGROUP B – Betway Power – Uganda; Gondar City – Ethiopia; A.B.C – Tanzania; K.P.A – KenyaWomen (round robin)UCU,  KCCA,  Equity, KPA,  Horseed , APR, Don BoscoKampala, Uganda | THE INDEPENDENT | Fifteeen clubs from five countries will battle for honours at this year’s FIBA Africa Zone 5 Club Championships hosted by Ugandan giants City Oilers Basketball Club and the sports governing body FUBA.The regional basketball tournament  was launched in Kampala on Saturday by Italian Ambassador to Uganda Domenico Fornara who handed over the trophies to be competed for to FUBA President Ambrose Tashobya.This is the 3rd time Uganda is hosting the Zone 5 Club Championships since it changed name in 2009. The tournament is sponsored by Stanbic Bank, Enoc Oil, Linglong Tires and Mandela Group.The week-long tournament that started Sunday morning at Lugogo will also serve as regional qualifiers for the FIBA Africa Club Championship finals to be hosted in Casablanca, Morocco in December. Uganda’s City Oilers are defending champions of the Zone 5 tournament.City Tyres Marketing Manager Herbert Bashasha on behalf of Mandela Group earlier handed over a digital scoreboard to FUBA ahead of the FIBA Zone 5 Club Championships.last_img read more

first_imgLane Thrap had 27 points and the No. 7 St. Bernard’s Crusaders boys’ basketball team punched a ticket to the quarterfinals of the NCS D-VI championships, holding off visiting No. 10 Archbishop Hanna Hawks 68-64 in the opening round of the tournament Wednesday night at St. Bernard’s High.In what was a back and forth affair Wednesday night it was Crusaders’ forward Will Omey who gave his team the last lead of the night it would need to fend off the Hawks. Omey picked off a pass near half court …last_img read more

first_imgMany of the West’s greatest parks and scenic areas lie on the Colorado Plateau, a large basin covering parts of Arizona, Utah, New Mexico and Colorado.  Within its rugged acres are the Grand Canyon, Grand Staircase, Bryce Canyon, Zion Canyon, Arches, Canyonlands, Capitol Reef, Natural Bridges, Monument Valley, Mesa Verde, Glen Canyon and Lake Powell, and numerous small parks and scenic byways.  How this vast region rose 2 kilometers high away from plate boundaries, and maintained sedimentary strata miles thick that often lie flat as a pancake for hundreds of miles, is an enigma to geologists – and it underscores the problem historical sciences have with making pronouncements about the unobservable past.    Rebecca M. Flowers (U of Colorado, Boulder) wrote about “The enigmatic rise of the Colorado Plateau” in the journal Geology this month.1 How and when the Colorado Plateau attained its current mean elevation of ~2 km has puzzled scientists for nearly 150 yr.  This problem is most dramatically manifest when standing on the rim of the Grand Canyon, viewing the extraordinary 1500-m-deep gorge carved into nearly horizontal sedimentary rocks that were deposited during the 500 m.y. prior to plateau uplift when the region resided near sea level.  What caused the elevation gain of this previously stable cratonic region in Cenozoic time?  Did the source of buoyancy for plateau uplift arise from the crust, lithospheric mantle, or asthenosphere, or through some combination of the three?  Why did this low-relief plateau escape significant upper crustal strain during uplift, in contrast to the Cenozoic surface deformation that is so strikingly apparent in the high-relief landscape of the surrounding Rocky Mountain, Rio Grande Rift, and Basin and Range provinces (Fig. 1)?The current issue contains two new theories, but Flowers is not convinced of either of them.  Here are a few quotes from the article indicating the degree of doubt and frustration explaining the Colorado Plateau.Although there is a first-order understanding of vertical motions in areas close to plate boundaries, there is comparatively little consensus on the causes of such motions distal from these margins.  The Colorado Plateau exemplifies this problem.Hypothesized mechanisms include partial removal of the lithospheric mantle (e.g., Spencer, 1996), chemical alteration of the lithosphere owing to volatile addition or magma extraction (e.g., Humphreys et al., 2003; Roy et al., 2004), warming of heterogeneous lithosphere (Roy et al., 2009), hot upwelling within the asthenosphere (Parsons and McCarthy, 1995; Moucha et al., 2009), and crustal thickening (McQuarrie and Chase, 2000).  It is clear that there is no shortage of mechanisms that could explain the plateau’s origin.  The core challenge is determining which mechanism, or combination of mechanisms, is indeed the cause.One question arising from these two studies is: are their conclusions compatible?The other obvious question that emerges from these efforts is both more important and far more difficult to answer.  Do the proposed models accurately describe the true origin and evolution of Colorado Plateau elevation?One reason why resolving the cause of plateau uplift is such a tough problem is that deciphering the paleoelevation of continents is extremely difficult, and the plateau’s elevation history is critically important for isolating the correct uplift mechanism.Not surprisingly, contradictory interpretations regarding the uplift history of the Colorado Plateau often arise from the diverse information yielded by the many studies in this region.The two geodynamic studies in this issue of Geology underscore the probable complexity of the plateau’s history.  They especially highlight the unlikelihood of the entire plateau undergoing a single spatially uniform phase of surface uplift, and emphasize the potential for significant geographic and temporal heterogeneity in elevation gain.  Such a history would only exacerbate the challenge of accurately reconstructing the plateau’s evolution from the geological record.The “perplexing story” is not limited to explaining this one region.  As Flowers said, if we can’t understand this plateau, we can’t explain a lot of other earth formations.  “The answers to these contentious questions are significant for understanding how deep-seated processes control the elevation change and topographic evolution of Earth’s surface.”1.  Rebecca M. Flowers, “The enigmatic rise of the Colorado Plateau” (open access), Geology v. 38 no. 7, p. 671-672, doi: 10.1130/focus072010.1.They don’t tell you these things on the National Park signs.  The parks make it sound so easy.  A million years here, a few billion years there, and presto: Grand Canyon.  Remember this article next time you travel the Colorado Plateau.  They don’t have a clue after 150 years of thinking about it.  How much more time should we give the clueless before opening the doors to thinking outside the box?    One of the biggest stumbling blocks for them understanding this region is their insistence on deep time and their denial of the catastrophic power of the Flood.  They should really take some creation geology papers more seriously (06/21/2010) unless they find cluelessness somehow comforting.  Now why would that be?  Job security.(Visited 83 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

first_img29 July 2002Cape Town is many cities – and, indeed, many countries. Sometimes it is San Francisco, lights twinkling with the sea in the background; sometimes it is New Orleans, with the old lacy balconies of Long Street tarted up to resemble that steamy city of the American South; sometimes it is a French street scene; sometimes a German landscape.Or it can present itself simply as an anonymous but breathtaking backdrop – a swathe of green mountainside, a gorgeous beach, a cool, dark forest.South Africa’s oldest city is her newest high-profile actress. Cape Town is starring in commercials and feature films from all round the world, and has become a favoured location for filmmakers keen to make use of the city and its environs’ natural beauty as well as to employ a technically advanced film industry that can compete with that of Europe or the US for skills and savvy.Renowned for some of the world’s finest wines, the vast fertile valleys of the Cape winelands could be mistaken for similar locations anywhere on earth. (Photo: Moonlighting Film Production Services)It also helps that when Northern European or American filmmakers translate their dollars or euros into rands, their budgets suddenly seem to have grown tenfold.South African film: looking backThe film industry in this country goes back a long way. The first newsreels ever were shot in South Africa during the Anglo-Boer War at the turn of the previous century. The weekly cinema newsreel African Mirror was launched in 1913 and ran until the 1980s.In 1916, the magnate IW Schlesinger set up Killarney Studios and began an extraordinary run of productions (43 movies until 1922) that included De Voortrekkers, a piece of Afrikaner nationalist propaganda celebrating the Great Trek from the British colony of the Cape to new pastures further north, and Symbol of Sacrifice, about the Anglo-Zulu wars.As leading South African cinema academic Keyan Tomaselli put it, these movies “were rooted in the ideological outlook of the present, with Boer and Briton standing together under the flame of unity and civilisation against barbaric hordes”.Schlesinger’s production line declined in the Twenties, access to international markets having become limited. What Tomaselli calls a “30-year lull” began, broken by the beginnings of Afrikaner establishment investment in the film industry in the 1950s.What emerged then, and continued into the 1970s, was a plethora of state-funded light entertainment for Afrikaans-speaking whites starring the likes of singer Ge Korsten and comedian Al Debbo.A prominent genre of the time, too, was ‘the border film’, in which South African soldiers fended off the perceived communist-inspired threat on the country’s borders. There was also the international success of Jamie Uys’s politically suspect comedy The Gods Must be Crazy in 1980, but that was a bit of a one-off.South Africa has yet to produce a movie to match it for fame around the world, which is rather embarrassing.In the meantime, though, anti-apartheid cinema had grown as the Afrikaner-dominated state entrenched itself. Lionel Rogosin made the semi-documentary Come Back Africa in 1959, using real denizens of the vibrant and soon-to-be-demolished Sophiatown area in his tale of how the new regime was warping life in this country. Exiled filmmaker Lionel Ngakane contributed to this genre with Vukani Awake in 1964 and 1966.In the 1970s, movies critical of apartheid were made within South Africa by a first wave of true independents. They included Jans Rautenbach’s Jannie Totsiens and the series of films Ross Devenish made with playwright Athol Fugard. Another playwright to move into cinema, though briefly, was township troupe-leader Gibson Kente, though his How Long Must We Suffer? received only a very limited release.In the 1980s, the state funded low-budget feature films specifically for black audiences, and gave tax breaks to foreign companies wanting to churn out cheap product for the straight-to-video market. Some people made money, and many learned new skills, but few of these movies were worth seeing.The real cinema of South Africa was semi-underground, being made by mavericks with low budgets: Darrell Roodt’s Place of Weeping and Jobman, Oliver Schmitz’s Mapantsula, Manie van Rensburg’s The Fourth Reich, Katinka Heyns’s Die Storie van Klara Viljee, and Andrew Worsdale’s Shot Down.In the new post-apartheid era, the South African film industry is still struggling to find its feet when it comes to the kind of feature films seen on screens around the world. Neal Sundstrom’s Inside Out was a pleasant comedy playing with South African stereotypes, and Gavin Hood’s A Reasonable Man is a serious study of tradition versus modernity that has been seen at festivals around the world.A new black cinema has shown signs of coming into being: Ntshaveni wa Luruli’s Chikin Biznis launched the genre of township comedy, and Ramadan Suleman translated Njabulo Ndebele’s short story Fools to the big screen.But the biggest recent commercial success has been Leon Schuster’s excremental comedy Mr Bones, which is now among SA’s top-grossing films in this market, and is making some headway in markets abroad. It seems to be reaching the “lowest common denominator”, if nothing else.Signs of a rapidly maturing industryYet the industry is rapidly growing toward maturity. Infrastructure is expanding all the time, and our industry is networking itself all over the world.Cape Town is the host of Sithengi, the annual Southern African International Film and Television Market, now in its seventh year. Taking place every September, it is attended by some 1 000 delegates from this country and all over the world.About the same number attended the International Public Television Conference, in the same city, this year – the first time the event has taken place outside Europe or the US.A new international festival is also on the cards for Gauteng, when the Jozi Summit Film Festival takes place alongside the World Summit on Sustainable Development in August 2002. There will be workshops and training sessions, with the participation of leading industry players, as well as a host of screenings (more than 600 showings of some 100 movies) at venues ranging from commercial cinemas in shopping centres to township locations.Ongoing festivals such as the Out in Africa Gay and Lesbian Film Festival have a long history, and many foreign countries have annual festivals in South Africa showcasing the best of their national product to an appreciative audience.The audience is there, certainly, as are the technical skills and the lauded locations. As far as the growth of a homegrown movie industry is concerned, more development needs to take place in the realm of scriptwriting and directorial skills, but workshops such as Scrawl, as well as programmes at universities and other educational institutions, are filling the gaps.The potential is huge, as filmmakers have realised. Investment in basic infrastructure is growing fast: the large Sasani Studio has sprung up at Cape Town’s V&A Waterfront, while the same city’s Longkloof Studios are being upgraded to the tune of R20-million. German equipment-rental company CineLicht has established a subsidiary in Cape Town, and British lighting company AFM now has a base in Johannesburg.And movies are being made. Cape Town, once again, stars in several: The Piano Player, featuring Christopher Lambert and Dennis Hopper, recently finished shooting there, as did Manhunt, with SA-born Mummy star Arnold Vosloo; Borderline, starting Sean Patrick Flannery, is in production.Co-productions based on South African subject matter, with international backing, to be shot somewhere in South Africa, are in the works: pre-production work is well advanced on producer Anant Singh’s version of Nelson Mandela’s autobiography, Long Walk to Freedom, and JM Coetzee’s controversial and acclaimed Booker Prize-winning novel, Disgrace, is now casting, to be directed by British director Charles Sturridge.Movies based on the story of Amy Biehl, the young American slain in a Cape township, and that of the “Bang Bang Club” of Eighties news photographers, are in development. Not to mention the slate of German TV movies and the Scandinavian reality TV show The Fear Factor.World-class commercialsBut the biggest, fastest, most lucrative part of the film industry in this country, the part that really gets international filmmakers enthusiastic, is the commercials industry. Over the past few years the number of foreign commercials being shot in South Africa, particularly Cape Town, has just grown and grown.French, German, British, American, Israeli, Belgian, Italian, Scandinavian and even Turkish commercials have been shot in Cape Town, all contributing to the estimated R2-billion total worth of the industry in this country.Cape Town has the looks, and she’s definitely our cover girl, but Gauteng also has considerable resources at its disposal, and accounts for a very substantial portion of local film industry revenue. Cape Town may have the locations, but Gauteng has the sophisticated studios and the editing suites.Between these two centres, and with the whole of a diversely beautiful country waiting for its close-up, it’s hard not to believe that filmmaking in South Africa can only continue to burgeon. We are becoming ever more a part of the international film, television and commercials industry, and soon we’ll be making masterpieces of our own.Shaun de Waal, twice-winner of the Pringle Award for best movie critic in South Africa and former arts and books editor of the Mail & Guardian, is the author of several books and a graphic novel. Want to use this article in your publication or on your website?See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

first_img27 March 2013 South African state oil company PetroSA and China’s Sinopec Group took another step towards creating Africa’s largest oil refinery after the two firms signed an agreement in Pretoria on Tuesday. The US$10-billion Mthombo refinery project is planned for the Coega Industrial Development Zone outside Port Elizabeth in the Eastern Cape. The agreement, signed during a meeting between President Jacob Zuma and Chinese President Xi Jinping in Pretoria on Tuesday, will create opportunities for oil and gas exploration. Jinping is in South Africa for the 5th BRICS (Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa) summit, which got under way in Durban on Tuesday. “The framework agreement enables the two companies to move forward this global-scale crude oil refinery project,” the two chairmen, PetroSA’s Benny Mokaba and Sinopec’s Fu Chengyu, said in a statement. According to Business Day, the refinery would pump approximately 360 000 barrels per day, while creating 27 500 direct and indirect jobs during construction and 18 000 jobs when it started operating. The agreement follows the signing of a study agreement between the two companies in May last year. Mokaba described the agreement as an important building block in bringing the project to fruition. “[It] gives PetroSA the opportunity to extend a mutually beneficial relationship with a major national oil company,” he said. “This strategic relationship can and will be leveraged to benefit PetroSA’s sustainability and growth programmes.” As part of their growth plans, the companies agreed to include the Industrial Development Corporation (IDC) in the next phase of the project’s development. Downstream opportunities in southern Africa will also be explored, as will the development of storage and logistical infrastructure. “South Africa is politically stable and economically developed,” Fu said. “Sinopec pays close attention to its business growth in South Africa, and wishes to contribute to local economic and social development.” SAinfo reporterlast_img read more

first_imgQC cops nab robbery gang leader, cohort Cayetano: 4 social media groups behind SEA Games ‘sabotage’ And the 31-year-old Castro couldn’t reiterate more how important starting strong is for Gilas as they seek a top three finish in the group to proceed to the next round.“With the new format, it’s really difficult,” he said. “The two games were must-wins for us because we know here in Fiba, every game counts, and once you lose, there’s a chance that you’ll fall out of the top three. So going into this game, whatever happens, we just wanted to win. Even though we had a bad first half, we played better in the second half.”The Philippines may have remained unbeaten through the first window, but Castro said that the first set of games were an eye-opener for the squad as Gilas aims for a better performance come the second window in February, where a date against Australia awaits.“Our first game (against Japan) was okay, but in this game (against Chinese Taipei), we played terrible on both defense and offense. We can’t execute our plays when the opponent is zoning. So in the next window, we have to improve our ball movement and calm ourselves because we’re too overeager,” he said.“It’s just a good thing that with this format, we have a lot of time to prepare, correct our mistakes, and improve for the next games. That’s something we need to do if we want to go back to the Fiba World Cup and the Olympics.”ADVERTISEMENT Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC Blatche ‘apologized’ to Gilas for subpar showing, says Reyes Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH Read Next MOST READcenter_img CPP denies ‘Ka Diego’ arrest caused ‘mass panic’ among S. Tagalog NPA Photo by Sherwin Vardeleon/INQUIRERGilas Pilipinas goes where Jayson Castro takes them.Showing why he’s been hailed as the best point guard in Asia twice, the speedy playmaker from Bacolor, Pampanga has undoubtedly been the stabilizing force for the national team in the first window of the 2019 Fiba World Cup Asian qualifiers.ADVERTISEMENT Stronger peso trims PH debt value to P7.9 trillion LATEST STORIES Kammuri turning to super typhoon less likely but possible — Pagasa Japan ex-PM Nakasone who boosted ties with US dies at 101 Coming off a sensational showing against Japan, Castro once again dazzled in front of the home crowd, anchoring the offense for the Philippine side before taking matters to his own hands late to seal the 90-83 victory over Chinese Taipei.But what drives Castro to perform at his best is his unwavering desire win.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutout“In my mind, I really just wanted to win,” he said in Filipino after torching the visiting Chinese Taipei with 20 points, four rebounds, and four assists on Monday.That passion was certainly evident as Castro led the Philippines to a 2-0 start joining reigning Fiba Asia champion Australia atop Group B standings. View commentslast_img read more

first_imgPulisic knows he must prove himself to Chelsea manager Lampardby Freddie Taylor10 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveChristian Pulisic says he has to prove himself to Chelsea manager Frank Lampard. The 21-year-old, signed from Borussia Dortmund in the summer, has been used sporadically by the Blues boss this season. And the American knows reputation alone won’t convince Lampard to give him playing time.Speaking to the Players’ Tribune, the winger said “If you can play, you can play and that’s why Dortmund was amazing for me, the coach always trusted me. But you’ve got to prove yourself maybe that extra mile.”I have to prove myself no matter what age I am.”I don’t feel like I’m some wonder boy anymore, I’ve been around and I think I’ve earned that respect at least and I’m in a new chapter and I’m going to prove myself.” About the authorFreddie TaylorShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more